General Specialist

2008-10-09

Learn VFX from the Masters of the Universe


The world's best supervisors including John Knoll, Scott Squires, John Dykstra, Pablo Helman, Dennis Murren, Mike Fink, Ken Ralson and Kim Libreri are part of a course in the new term at fxphd.com. Imagine learning stuff from the people behind such milestones as Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Star Wars I to VI, Wargames, Back to the Future, The Abyss, Indiana Jones, Terminator 2 & 3, The Matrix, Pirates of the Caribbean and many more of the films that have shaped the last decades.


You already know how much I can recommend fxphd, and the new term is even better than the last one. Make sure you look at the overview movie.

Here's a complete list of available courses. The term starts on October 13 2008, but you can join later and have access to all the classes you've signed up for.

I've been swamped with work, so I still have a couple of courses left from the last term to watch (a tip: convert the classes so you can watch them on a portable media player of your choice; I watch classes in bed while waiting for the kids to fall asleep.)

This new term I'll be taking the DIT course, the new RED course and either Mark Christiansen's AE course or Tim Clapham's AE+C4D course. I wish I had time to dig into the Fusion course as well, but we'll see how it goes.


Oh, if you enter humlan in the Referring Member field on the signup page, I'll get an extra class, which would be really nice. Thanks in advance!

- Jonas

Labels: , , , , , ,

2008-10-08

Watch and Embed YouTube Clips in High Quality

The term "High Quality" has to be taken with a bucket of salt when we're talking about YouTube, but there's an easy way to at least lessen the compression artifacts, which is especially useful for full-screen viewing. Even a lot of clips that don't have the "Watch in High Quality" link on the page actually exists in a less compressed version.

If you are watching the clip at YouTube.com, just add &fmt=18 at the end of the URL. The easiest way to do this is the create a bookmark in your browser's toolbar. Just bookmark any site and then replace the URL of the bookmark's Location with this simple JavaScript: javascript:window.location+="&fmt=18";
Every time you're at YouTube you can just click the bookmark to see the clip with less compression (if it's available, otherwise the standard clip will play.)

See the difference for yourself:


If you embed videos, you can do the same thing and even embed a larger version, but you have to append &ap=%2526fmt%3D18 to both URL's in the code, plus change the sizes in both places to 480 by 360.





You can also watch YouTube videos with QuickTime embedded player if you'd like, and easily download the clips (if you have QuickTime Player Pro.)


- Jonas

Tip of the hat to My Digital Life and Tobias Lind.

Labels: , ,